Tag Archives: Cold Ashton

The Cotswold Way – Cold Ashton to Bath

July 21 – This is it! Last Cotswold walking day! I must say, I was eager to move on from that shepherds hut this morning. Jim made us a lovely breakfast with the meager provisions provided by our host, with me staying in bed to keep out of his way.

Then Jim moved outside so I could wash the dishes! (Yes, there is a tiny cold water sink behind the stove.) I know tiny houses are the rage these days, but I don’t think I’m a suitable candidate for one…

Nine miles gets us into the city today. A hill to climb, some woods, some farmer’s fields. Here is the ultimate cow.

We walked through the battlefield of the Battle of Lansdown 1643. The Royalists beat the Parliamentarians as far as we could tell.

The ultimate golf course. Have I mentioned that everyone walks with their own cat here? We haven’t seen electric carts at any of the courses.

Ready for one last word? On our maps, areas of “tumuli” are indicated. We thought it was some kind of plant that we had never heard of. Turns out, it’s another word for burial mounds or barrows. Tumuli, (TOOM you lee) plural of tumulus. I learn something new every day.

Before we knew it, there was Bath below!

We walked to Bath Abbey, the official end of the 102 mile Cotswold Way. More about Bath tomorrow!

The Cotswold Way – Chipping Sodbury to Cold Ashton

July 20 – Didn’t want to leave our cool and spacious room over the gastro-pub this morning. We lingered over a fantastic breakfast chatting with the chef before beginning our penultimate hiking day. The chef spends his summers here, then travels to Japan in the winter to teach snowboarding. He reminded us of Christopher. Nice life! Eleven miles today, still sunny and warm.

We stopped into the church of St. Mary Magdalene, and I was thrilled to see memorial poems on the walls. Usually, I love finding interesting tombstones, but with the sandstone used universally here, any writing over a hundred years or so is no longer legible.

The church had a sign about the Ceysell Brass from 1493, and we looked high and low but could not find it.

I looked down and lifted a corner of the rug and voila! There it was!

We approached another little town at lunchtime, that had a similar church, St. Peters, and a similar brass. This one was open for all to see.

We ate our lunch in the church cemetery – cool and shady. There were formal gardens below, with lots of tourists strolling about.

I promised myself to stop showing hillsides and pastorals, but this is our penultimate day, so here are some penultimate cows.

By mid afternoon we arrived at Hill Farm B&B, where we had been warned by our travel agent that there were no rooms available, so we would be sleeping in “the shepherd’s hut.” It sounded quaint, but turned out to be a teeny tiny trailer with a corrugated metal roof out in the hot sun. It was REALLY hot inside, with no fan or way to make a cross-breeze. The host was not home, but left us a note to make ourselves comfortable. Ha!

We showered in the tiny bathroom, but started to sweat as soon as we emerged. Our host had left us one bottle of water, with instructions not to drink the water that came from the tap. We were dehydrated and overheated. We’re gonna die!

I went outside looking for any shady place, and found a lovely covered patio with a cool breeze at the top of the hill. We retired there with our books and waited for our host to return. When she did, she assured us that the hut would cool down in the evening, and she was right. This is a self catering B&B, so we heated our lasagna dinners in our tiny microwave, and ate outside at our tiny table.

Here’s to the Cotswold Way!